Easy Tips and Approaches For Your Flower Garden Designs

Make Your Flower Garden Designs Sweaty

Are you one of the people I know who are creative but just too shy to show their skills? Are you fond of flowers and plants? Are you not afraid to get sweaty and dirty in your garden? Are you the kind of person who loves doing things on his or her own? Then why not start building a flower garden designs and make use of it? Why don’t you show your other side to your family and friends? And prove to them that canvassing on nature is one of a kind.

You can express your real self by designing your flower garden designs base on your personality. It is your own gardens so don’t be afraid to do whatever you want. Yes, I know designing your own garden will need a lot of effort from you but don’t worry because in the end you will definitely be satisfied with the result. Remember there is no right and wrong when you are designing your own patio garden design, you yourself will be the one to dictate on what you should do, but considering some helpful tips with some garden design books will help you make the most of your designs attractive.

Tips Which Can Assist You When You Start Designing Your Own Garden:

  • The first tip would be considering the purpose of your garden. Will it be an area where you and your family can relax or will it be an area where your kids can run around or play? You should think of these things before splurging on things for your garden, the thing here is to think of who will often be around in your garden. If you are living with children, you should consider some safety measures that can affect the design and as well as your garden itself. So think about what is your garden for?
  • The next thing that you should think about is your budget. Do you want to spend a lot of money in designing your garden? Or do you want to lessen the expenses? The key here is to list all the important things that your garden needs for you to be able to budget your money. You can also recycle things that you think have no use. You are not only saving a lot of money by recycling but also you are helping our environment. If you want to make your garden look dramatic, you can put fewer plants as these make a more dramatic effect than splurging a lot.
  • When designing your garden, make sure that you design every corner of your garden. People will not only look at one side, people will look at your entire garden to check your creation. So start imagining your garden as a whole rather than taking just one specific area. For people who have limited space, try figuring out what design will look good that won’t disorder your limited space. The answer in making your garden look attractive is not by putting a lot of plants but by adding some tools that will enhance the look of your garden.

You should always put in mind that the garden you are designing is yours. Remember to do everything that will make you feel better. Make it as relaxing as you want for you to have a sanctuary whenever you needed to unwind and rest your mind. Your patio garden design will reflect your personality so you should design it carefully.

Easy Guide to Herb Garden Designs

In the past herb garden designs were dictated by the herbs planted in them and classified as useful or ornamental. Truth of the matter is you can mix and match the following ideas to originate your very own special herb garden designs. It’s your garden after all and like art these designs express your unique inner soul.

Yet, contrary to expectation, the first step in creating your herb garden designs is not to immediately draw your designs but to first list down the reasons for which you want to have your own herb garden.

Once you have your reasons listed down you can then match against those reasons, the herbs that will provide you with the solutions for your bespoke herb garden designs. Consider at this stage:

o their usefulness (for cooking, herbal remedies for ailments, for decoration in the house and so on)

o their looks, colours and fragrances and how you can group them together according to good herb gardening principles.

o their size and height – for deciding which to plant in front of which.

o the location and size (length and breadth) of the garden and how the plants can fit into that space aesthetically.

o how you would arrange the plants in the garden on the basis of their attributes and environmental requirements.

For your herb garden designs, you can decide on how your herb plants can be grown,

o in the ground in a formal structure or informal and casual, according to their purpose like the kitchen garden outside the kitchen door.

o in pots that are casually arranged on the patio

o in designer or specially constructed containers indoors or outdoors

o in single containers like:
o a windowsill box
o a ceramic or terracotta “strawberry” pot
o an herb garden kit.
o Even an old chimney pot can make an attractive display.
o You can use old tyres, cracked teapots, old pails, etc. Be selective though as the containers used will set the tone of the garden.

After jotting down all your requirements it is then time to put them together into the visualisation of the herb garden designs that will meet most if not all the needs you have written down.

Take your time and pleasure in creating your herb garden designs in your imagination. The more time, thought, colour and movement you visualise, the more real your vision becomes and the more useful and beautiful your garden will turn out to be for you.

The physical aspects of your herb garden designs can be:

o Large, formal and structured – utilitarian or ornamental. This is usually a walled garden that is rectangular in shape and divided into two parallel rows which are then subdivided into a number of beds that will each hold a specific group of herbs.

You can also divide the plot up into a number of squares or rectangles or even triangles laid out in a simple pattern to fit into the plot of available land. There could then be pathways cut out, normally in a symmetrical design that has the specific purpose of allowing easy access to each herb bed.

It would not be unthinkable to have a kitchen garden in a formal setting that incorporates a healing garden in the centre of it.

o In medieval times there were herb garden designs created purely for pleasure. The gardens may be smaller in size, probably a little structured and housed plants that had been chosen for their aroma and beauty, a place where one can sit down to enjoy the sights, sounds and scents.

o Formal herb garden designs later on took on the more complicated pattern made up of squares, rectangles and especially knots which were particularly popular in pleasure gardens.

o Unstructured herb garden designs include plants that had been selected for their particular use like culinary plants near the kitchen door.

o Herb garden designs for the indoors include potted herbs in containers for decorative purposes. It would be hard to avoid the usefulness of the herbal crops even though your intention was not focused on using the herbs.

o Outdoors in containers on the patio.

o On a purpose built rooftop garden

Just ensure that the three main rules for gardening are met if you expect success. They are sufficient lighting (natural or fluorescent), water and well drained soil.

By the way, there is no rule to say that you can have only one garden. You can have one indoors in addition to the one outdoors!

Whatever the purpose of your herb garden designs, take the opportunity to add an ornamental aspect to it. This will enhance and extend greatly your enjoyment of it.

If you need guidance on the exact steps to take to give you the assured outcome you desire then evaluate “Successful Herb Gardening ~ Step-by-Step” at 100% risk free. You can download it whenever you wish at the Herb Gardening Site.

Issues in Garden Design – Designing Gardens With Limited Space and for Health and Play

Perhaps the trend towards smaller gardens makes good design even more important. It is often said that designing a small garden is more difficult than designing a large one. In a small space there can be issues of privacy; the need to disguise borders whilst still maintaining enough usable space. Choice of plants is critical because each plant has to earn its living in more than one way – a small tree, such as Amelanchier lamarckii, for instance, will provide spring blossom, attractive spring foliage, summer shade, autumn colour and winter structure – a shrub such as Choisya ternata will be evergreen, provide spring flowers, sometimes with a second flush in September, and a gorgeous scent when its leaves are brushed, whereas something like an oriental poppy (Papaver orientale), spectacular though its flowers are, will only bloom for a short period, and leave behind rather scruffy foliage for the rest of the season, or a hole if it is cut down, and in any case dies down in winter. It really doesn’t earn its keep where interest needs to be maintained throughout the year within a limited space. Although the space is small, planting should not be limited to small plants which can make the space seem even smaller. Climbers are an essential ingredient in a small garden, and this is where green roofs and living walls come into their own. Gardens in built up areas can be very sheltered, so allowing a wider range of less hardy plants to be grown, on the other hand, they can be very shady, which offers its own set of planting opportunities. Good design will maximise the opportunities presented by any setting, and create a coherent space, full of interest that offers an enhanced quality of life.

However, budget may be another problem. Garden designers, like everyone else, are facing recession. It may be difficult to persuade people to splash out on what is seen as a luxury, and when they do decide to invest in having their garden designed, the budgets available may constrain the design. We have to be inventive about how we retain the quality of design whilst limiting the cost, for instance by specifying smaller but faster growing trees, rather than spending money on mature specimens. Garden designers are also having to diversify by looking towards designing public spaces, writing, teaching, supplying plants and offering garden maintenance as supplementary sources of income.

Some of the public spaces garden designers have been called upon to design in recent years include hospital and hospice gardens, and there is a growing interest in the impact of gardens on health and well-being. According to a paper presented by Roger S. Ulrich PhD, to the International Exhibition Floriade conference ‘Plants for People’, entitled “Health Benefits of Gardens in Hospitals”, there are significant benefits to patients of viewing environments dominated by greenery, flowers or water, in terms of reducing stress, diminishing stressful thoughts, promoting recovery, elevating positive emotions and reducing negative emotions such as fear, anger and sadness. These can be measured in terms of blood pressure, heart activity, muscle tension and brain electrical activity. There is also a decrease in anxiety, pain and the length of stay in hospital when an appropriately designed garden is provided, and an increase in levels of patient satisfaction. As far as the design goes, an over dominance of hardlandscaping at the expense of planting, is detrimental to these positive outcomes, and abstract, ambiguous artworks can aggravate stress rather than reduce it. So concentrating on planting and natural scenery seems to be the best policy for a designer, which allows him or her plenty of scope to think about appealing to the senses – sight, sound and smell through the use of scented plants, water for sound, making the garden attractive to birds which will sing, choosing plants for year round colour, texture and movement. Soft and gentle colours, avoiding any violent clashes, may provide a calm and stress-reducing atmosphere, such as greens, lavenders, pinks and blues, although gentle yellows and whites can also be uplifting. The garden needs to be calming and relaxing, but still retain interest.

Gardens can also have a beneficial effect on mental health. Having the opportunity to work in a garden can be therapeutic, and at a time of growing obesity, any outdoor activity can help. Children, it is often said, are becoming out of touch with where food comes from and garden designers can help by designing public and private spaces that put them back in touch with nature and consider their educational and play needs. What children need most from a garden setting is space to play. Quite aside from all the play equipment such as trampolines, swings, tree-houses, Wendy houses, sandpits, swimming pools or paddling pools that can be provided, just having a range of colours, textures, sizes and shapes of plants can provide a stimulating environment. Places to hide, shrubberies to build dens in, mud to dig in are all play opportunities. Tall grasses and tall perennials that tower over the children’s heads, with paths winding through can be magical, as can very small plants. Conkers, acorns or cobnuts to collect, and ponds to do pond dipping are all stimulating and educational opportunities. A garden is a good way of introducing children to wildlife, and no child’s education can be complete without having the chance to grow something from seed. Of course, as designers we must take into account safety issues, including putting a grate over ponds, making sure boundaries are secure, and not planting the most poisonous plants, although no garden can be completely risk free, and there are so many poisonous plants, it is better to educate children not to eat them than trying to avoid them altogether.

Good garden design can be so beneficial to society that it should thrive in the 21st century in spite of recession.